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20130120
20130120
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
of experiences. both in foreign policy and on the crime bill, the '94 crime bill is something he shepherded and his extraordinary ability to deal with senate republicans in a way a lot of people can't. senator reed and mitch mcconnell don't get along that well so i don't read nieg into it other than the president has an eset in the vice president and he's using that asset and he's deploying him well. the thing we should be mindful of is that there's over the next four years there's going to be a lot of tea leaf reading but at the end of the day, you know, the president is using the personing that get a job done and he's done an extraordinary job so far. let me say, passing this legislation will be tough. it's important to put your best feet on the ground there because it's really not -- it's going to be tough to get these bills passed. >> and it's not just ability. the vice president -- and again i worked closely with him for a few years -- he really likes this kind of political dealmaking in a way i don't think the president likes that much. if he's pushed to it he can do it. but the vice
of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that facr into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next
foreign policy agenda. >> what was hillary clinton's initial reaction when you told her, look, they're considering you as a possibility for secretary of state? >> she didn't believe it. >> fell leap is one of clinton's closest aides. >> i e-mailed her, i think it was the friday after election day, after hearing it from two reporters and i'm pretty sure her rely was something along the lines of not for a million reasons. >> if she was hesitant why not just say no? >> i think she did, or came awfully close. i think the president was very persuasive. >> we're delighted to welcome senator clinton, secretary of state designate. >> clinton was quickly confirmed but how would she get along with the man who defeated her campaign? could she work for him? >> everyone expected, including myself, that there would be a lot of division, a lot of secretary clinton going behind the president's back. >> was there any tension coming in between the two people at the top? >> i think everyone's been surprised. >> surprised that while secretary clinton and president obama have been separated often as she
if there is a legacy on foreign policy other than the important moment of taking on -- >> it lets us take note in a way of the way the first family has lived their life in the white house, one thing that you noted is that the obamas like to go out to restaurants and eat out as opposed to the bushes who entertained inside the white house. how does that change the washington scene, do you think? >> i think there's almost been less of that, too. as time went on, there was a newness when they moved into their new city and their new community and they wanted to get out and about and be seen as members of our community family here in washington. but the reality is, it does get very hard to make the movements outside of the white house to disrupt the flow of traffic. although, it is an exciting moment, you know, from time to time when they are able to do that. so, i think, you know, the way you live your life before you came here is the way you try to live your life when you are here. >> you worked very closely with laura bush. >> i did. >> i'm just curious, this is the president's day and the vice president'
bit about foreign policy and maybe a tiny bit about 2016. oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. >>> we are back with former senator russ feingold, former house speaker newt gingrich and the stellar susan page and ron brownstein. thank you all for being here. i want to play you -- this is a couple of bits of the president talking about al qaeda and terrorism. >> al qaeda is on the path to defeat. war in afghanistan is winding down. al qaeda has been decimated. al qaeda's on the run and bin laden is dead. >> so my question out of this is algeria. northern africa has now, for a long time, we heard about yemen and somalia, places like that, but now hearing about algeria, mali. what -- it seems like it has become or been allowed to become a very dangerous place. >> this is something i worked on
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
building. thursday, january 24th, senate foreign relations committee will hold a confirmation hearing for secretary of state nominee john perry. that starts at 10:00 a.m. in the heart office building. and on friday, january 25th, georgetown public policy holds an inaugural conference on at- risk children, youth and system reform. it will be held at 8:30 a.m. at the georgetown university conference center here in washington. and that's your capital rundown for the week of january 21st, 2013. find us on myfoxdc.com and on twitter, #capital rundown. see you next week. >>> coming up later in sports, the wizards go down to the wire in los angeles and the capitals kickoff the season in tampa. we'll have the highlights later in sports. >> and rumors are swirling about a lady ga ga performance at one of the inaugural balls. we'll have a little bit more on that. >> but as we head to break, more inauguration facts. the first inauguration known to have been photographed was for james buchanan in 1857. james garfield was the first to view the parade from a stand built in front of the white house
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)